trolby:

You’ve come down in a nest of hostiles. They’ve heard the noise, they’re coming. The only safe path is toward the tower. You should be able to see that from where you are. If there’s anyone alive there, just run. Run!

So psyched for Zombie’s, Run! S3, which I will be playing as soon as I get my phone fixed. :/

<3

(via collected-sports-bra)


mumblingsage:

yamino:

iamingrid:

yamino:

omgthatdress:

Half-Mourning Dress
1910-1912
The Victoria &amp; Albert Museum

What’s a “half-mourning” dress?  Mourning in the front, party in the back?

Half-Mourning was the third stage of mourning for a widow. She would be expected to mourn her husband for at least two years, the stages being Full Mourning, Second Mourning and Half-Mourning. The different stages regulated what they would be wearing, with Full Mourning being all black and with no ornamentation, including the wodow’s veil, and the stages after that introducing some jewellery and modest ornamentation. When in Half-Mourning you would gradually include fabrics in other colors and sort of ease your way out of mourning. 
Wow, I am happy you made that joke so I could interpert it as a serious question and have an excuse to ramble on about clothing customs of the past, I am a historical fashion nerd.

That’s very informative, but I’m going to stick with my original head canon:


I love both the informed fashion history and the hilariously off-the-wall halves of this post.

mumblingsage:

yamino:

iamingrid:

yamino:

omgthatdress:

Half-Mourning Dress

1910-1912

The Victoria & Albert Museum

What’s a “half-mourning” dress?  Mourning in the front, party in the back?

Half-Mourning was the third stage of mourning for a widow. She would be expected to mourn her husband for at least two years, the stages being Full Mourning, Second Mourning and Half-Mourning. The different stages regulated what they would be wearing, with Full Mourning being all black and with no ornamentation, including the wodow’s veil, and the stages after that introducing some jewellery and modest ornamentation. When in Half-Mourning you would gradually include fabrics in other colors and sort of ease your way out of mourning. 

Wow, I am happy you made that joke so I could interpert it as a serious question and have an excuse to ramble on about clothing customs of the past, I am a historical fashion nerd.

That’s very informative, but I’m going to stick with my original head canon:

image

I love both the informed fashion history and the hilariously off-the-wall halves of this post.

(via captainhollyshort)


bossanovabyss:

relahvant:

WHAT IS THIS GLORIOUS CREATURE

It’s a pika!

Pretty sure that’s actually a Quokka? It’s a native Australian animal. 

(via captainhollyshort)



(via bloomsbumyst)


kayleyhyde:

kateoplis:

I still work.

We all know that feeling, vending machine

kayleyhyde:

kateoplis:

I still work.

We all know that feeling, vending machine

(via captainhollyshort)



socimages:

Snickers mocks the idea that men can respect women.

This is one of the most demoralizing ads I’ve seen in a long time. It’s an Australian ad for Snickers in which construction workers on a busy city street yell pro-feminist comments at women, like “I’d like to show you the respect you deserve” and ”You want to hear a filthy word? Gender bias” and “You know what I’d like to see? A society in which the objectification of women makes way for gender neutral interaction free from assumptions and expectations.”

The construction workers are actors, but the women on the street are (or appear to be) real and their reactions authentic. The first thing women do is get uncomfortable, revealing how a lifetime of experience makes them cringe at the prospect of a man yelling at them.  But, as women realize what’s going on, they’re obviously delighted.  They love the idea of getting support and respect instead of harassment from strange men.

This last woman actually places her hand on her heart and mouths “thank you” to the guys.

And then the commercial ends and it’s all yanked back in the most disgusting way. It ends by claiming that pro-feminist men are clearly unnatural. Men don’t respect women — at least, not this kind of man — they’re just so hungry they can’t think straight.

The twist ending is a genuine “fuck you” to the actual women who happened to walk by and become a part of the commercial.  I wonder, when the producers approached them to get their permission to be used on film, did they tell them how the commercial would end? I suspect not. And, if not, I bet seeing the commercial would feel like a betrayal. These women were (likely) given the impression that it was about respecting women, but instead it was about making fun of the idea that women deserve respect.

What a dick move, Snickers. I hope you’re happy with your misogynist consumer base, because I don’t think I can ever buy a Snickers bar again.  What else does your parent company sell? I’ll make a note.

Thanks to sociologist and pro-feminist Michael Kimmel for sending in the ad.

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.


Exam Block Blues

Unhappy late night emotion explosion.

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jetgreguar:

still my favorite fucking thing

jetgreguar:

still my favorite fucking thing

(via iamthefear)